midnight marauder

Graphic Designer / Illustrator / Cinephile
Woody Allen’s “The Purple Rose of Cairo” French Poster
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Woody Allen’s “The Purple Rose of Cairo” French Poster

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MM Weekly Inspirational Images

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thefilmstage:

The first poster for Woody Allen's Magic in the Moonlight.
See the trailer.

Poster by yours truly. MM

thefilmstage:

The first poster for Woody Allen's Magic in the Moonlight.

See the trailer.

Poster by yours truly.

MM

Dear Woody Allen

A few weeks back I was bored, very bored. My mother gave me a challenge. To work on a quick Poster for Woody Allen’s “Magic in the Moonlight”. I had seen the trailer the day before and liked it. I like anything Woody Allen makes. So I had a look on google for some images from the film to work with. Nothing really came up, so I took a few screen grabs from the Yahoo Trailer. 20 mins later came up with these.

image

Sent them to my mother and said there you go … hope you like them !

That’s it challenge over. She liked them. She liked them so much that she put them up on her tumblr blog. She has a terrific tumblr site filled with postings on history, writers, artists, photography and a lot on world cinema.

Well … people started liking the poster. So much so that people thought it was the actual poster for the film.

Cut to yesterday, the official poster is released.

Yes the poster has the Woody Allen font Windsor, yes it has Emma Stone and Colin Firth looking quirky. It’s a pretty average Hollywood poster.

Indiewire just put out an article about the Poster calling it “Early Contender for Worst Poster of 2014”.

Thing is, I didn’t have months to play around with it. I didn’t have loads of photos from the film set.

What I’d like to do is to actually get the opportunity to work on a honest to goodness poster for this film. So if anyone knows anybody at Sony Pictures Classics or anybody in Woody Allen’s camp please contact me.

And let’s make some Magic !!

thefilmstage:

A new poster for Woody Allen's Magic in the Moonlight.
See a much better one here, along with the trailer.

thefilmstage:

A new poster for Woody Allen's Magic in the Moonlight.

See a much better one here, along with the trailer.

(Source: cinefamily, via keyframedaily)

lapitiedangereuse:

Magic in the moonlight

lapitiedangereuse:

Magic in the moonlight

cinephiliabeyond:

Gordon Willis, the legendary cinematographer behind such classic 1970s films as ‘Annie Hall,’ ‘Klute,’ ‘The Parallax View,’ ‘All the President’s Men’ and the ‘Godfather’ series, died on Sunday. He was 82.

“For a while, I really didn’t know what to do with that movie,” he said of the original ‘Godfather’ in a 2002 interview on NPR’s Fresh Air. “I finally decided this should have this brassy, yellow look to it. Don’t ask me why. It just felt right.” Francis Ford Coppola, a collaborator on three films, once said of Willis, “He has a natural sense of structure and beauty, not unlike a Renaissance artist.”

VIDEO ESSAY: In Memory of Gordon Willis (1931-2014) by Nelson Carvajal:

In the fall of 2006, Globe reporter Mark Feeney talked with Gordon Willis at his Falmouth home about his life and work. Here is a transcript of his conversation with the acclaimed cinematographer. It’s a brilliant interview, full of golden nuggets.


There’s a quote from the interview you did for the book ‘Principal Photography,’ “Most art, if you want to call film an art, comes out of craft.”
Yeah. I’ll expand on that. Somebody will say, “How did you do that?” Well, you know, it’s not really “how” you do something that’s important, it’s “why” you do it. It’s what you do and why you do it that’s important, I said; then how becomes part of the chain. “How” is your craft. It’s something you should know and learn and then, like paintbrushes, you pick up what you need to do what you do. But you can’t transpose an idea without your craft. The natural thing for someone to do, we all tend to reduce or expand things to a level that we understand. But what you’re doing is you’re avoiding your ability to function [laughs]. You can really function well if you reduce or expand. They may hire you for that. But the real meaning of it is — like the guy who doesn’t really know how to light so he keeps reducing things so he doesn’t have to light — “Let’s shoot it on the lawn.” So bottom line is: You do have to learn your craft. A lot of kids shoot movies, they don’t shoot the movie. They have no ideas. What they do is go out and shoot everything, put it together in film school, then they try to make a movie out of it. That goes on with people who should know better, who are making money.

Craft Track honour the work of Gordon Willis, “what’s unique about Mr. Willis is that just about everything he said was a golden nugget. The closer we looked, the more we learned — which Jeff wrote about in his post, One Morning with the Master: 5 Things I Learned from Gordon Willis. Here it is, everything we ever posted and learned from our time with Mr. Willis. You can also enjoy the complete unedited audio interview here or on our Through the Lens iTunes podcast.” The Collected Wisdom of the Late Gordon Willis

INTERVIEW PART 1:

INTERVIEW PART 2:

Also Recommended Reading:

What is narrative filmmaking to you?
Gordon Willis: Good storytelling. I always said that you could photograph a good story badly and it wouldn’t matter, but you can shoot a bad story well and it’s not going to help the story at all. It’s not. But you get the two together, and it’s great.

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MM Weekly Inspirational Images : Series 003

Create and get Inspired

Thanks

MM

lwlies:

LWLies 49: The Blue Jasmine issue. Cover art by Kelly Thompson.Buy today from our online shop.
 

lwlies:

LWLies 49: The Blue Jasmine issue. Cover art by Kelly Thompson.

Buy today from our online shop.

 

(Source: lwlies)

thedissolve:

Poster designer Sam Smith continues his monthly Frames series with this custom poster for Blue Jasmine, which tweaks the “prestigious Woody Allen” model his recent film posters have followed. He explains it all in this month’s column.

thedissolve:

Poster designer Sam Smith continues his monthly Frames series with this custom poster for Blue Jasmine, which tweaks the “prestigious Woody Allen” model his recent film posters have followed. He explains it all in this month’s column.

CC Woody Allen’s “Crimes and Misdemeanors”

Fun Fact About the Film : After Viewing the First cut of the film, Allen decided to throw out the first act, call back the actors for reshoots, and focus on what turned out to be the central story.

MM

Siskel And Ebert review Hannah And Her Sisters (1986)

CC Woody Allen’s “Hannah and Her Sisters”
MM

CC Woody Allen’s “Hannah and Her Sisters”

MM

Scorsese, Coppola and Allen Together in One great Film …
NEW YORK STORIES Japanese Film Poster
MM

Scorsese, Coppola and Allen Together in One great Film …

NEW YORK STORIES Japanese Film Poster

MM