midnight marauder

Graphic Designer / Illustrator / Cinephile
'It's Okay with Me.'
An Online Poster Exhibition Based on Robert Altman and his Films.
Starts this Friday April 18th at a Random Time. 
MM

'It's Okay with Me.'

An Online Poster Exhibition Based on Robert Altman and his Films.

Starts this Friday April 18th at a Random Time. 

MM

Robert Altman’s Gosford Park Posters

'It's Okay with Me.'

An Online Poster Exhibition Based on Robert Altman and his Films.

Starts this Friday April 18th at a Random Time. 

MM

'It's Okay with Me.'

An Online Poster Exhibition Based on Robert Altman and his Films.

The show will make it’s Grand debut. April 18th at a Random Time. Don’t forget to follow me on Twitter for the Official Announcement.

The website will be available for press / blogs at an earlier time. Please email me to be on the list to get an early bird access password to see the site.

Password is only for press affiliated sites.

email : midmarauder@gmail.com

I appreciate all your support

Thanks so much ! 

MM

Robert Altman’s “Brewster McCloud”
Part of  'It's Okay with Me.'
An Online Poster Exhibition Based on Robert Altman’s Films
The show will make it’s Grand debut. April 18th at a Random Time. Don’t forget to follow me on Twitter for the Official Announcement.

Robert Altman’s “Brewster McCloud”

Part of  'It's Okay with Me.'

An Online Poster Exhibition Based on Robert Altman’s Films

The show will make it’s Grand debut. April 18th at a Random Time. Don’t forget to follow me on Twitter for the Official Announcement.

thedissolve:


“But the embodiment of all that is good about Popeye is [Shelley] Duvall’s Olive Oyl, who only needs the big shoes and the ornate headdress to look exactly how E.C. Segar imagined her in 1919. Tall, thin, and angular, with saucer eyes, full lips, jet-black hair, and a distinctly breathy tone of voice, Duvall was a symbol of the rebel 1970s in that she didn’t fall within the narrow spectrum of what a movie-star should look or sound like. As many have said, she was “born” to play Olive Oyl, but it’s a real performance, too, flighty and distracted, yet sweet to the core, with perfect little “oooooo” sounds whenever there’s trouble (she’s like a Marge Simpson precursor) and a moony romanticism that carries the spirit of the whole production. Her rendition of Harry Nilsson’s “He Needs Me” resurfaced to great effect in Paul Thomas Anderson’s Punch-Drunk Love—which owes much of its intoxicating mixture of violence, discord, and innocence to Altman’s film—but it stands on its own for its abrasive sweetness.”

In this month’s Departures, Scott Tobias offers a re-evaluation of the much-maligned Popeye, a big-budget, family-friendly musical adaptation that somehow fits snugly into director Robert Altman’s career. [Read more…]

thedissolve:

“But the embodiment of all that is good about Popeye is [Shelley] Duvall’s Olive Oyl, who only needs the big shoes and the ornate headdress to look exactly how E.C. Segar imagined her in 1919. Tall, thin, and angular, with saucer eyes, full lips, jet-black hair, and a distinctly breathy tone of voice, Duvall was a symbol of the rebel 1970s in that she didn’t fall within the narrow spectrum of what a movie-star should look or sound like. As many have said, she was “born” to play Olive Oyl, but it’s a real performance, too, flighty and distracted, yet sweet to the core, with perfect little “oooooo” sounds whenever there’s trouble (she’s like a Marge Simpson precursor) and a moony romanticism that carries the spirit of the whole production. Her rendition of Harry Nilsson’s “He Needs Me” resurfaced to great effect in Paul Thomas Anderson’s Punch-Drunk Love—which owes much of its intoxicating mixture of violence, discord, and innocence to Altman’s film—but it stands on its own for its abrasive sweetness.”

In this month’s Departures, Scott Tobias offers a re-evaluation of the much-maligned Popeye, a big-budget, family-friendly musical adaptation that somehow fits snugly into director Robert Altman’s career. [Read more…]

"It’s Okay with Me" Robert Altman Poster Exhibition Show is in it’s final stages of completion.
It’s proven to be quite a challenge and a labor of love.
With over 30 Plus films featured on the site in Poster form.
The site will also feature behind the scenes photos, Altman facts and a few film comments from fellow Altman Fans.
The Online show will make it’s Grand debut. April 18th at a Random Time. Don’t forget to follow me on Twitter for the Official Announcement.
The website will be available for press / blogs at an earlier time. Please email me to be on the list to get an early bird access password to see the site.
Password is only for press affiliated sites.
email : midmarauder@gmail.com
Thanks so much ! 
MM

"It’s Okay with Me" Robert Altman Poster Exhibition Show is in it’s final stages of completion.

It’s proven to be quite a challenge and a labor of love.

With over 30 Plus films featured on the site in Poster form.

The site will also feature behind the scenes photos, Altman facts and a few film comments from fellow Altman Fans.

The Online show will make it’s Grand debut. April 18th at a Random Time. Don’t forget to follow me on Twitter for the Official Announcement.

The website will be available for press / blogs at an earlier time. Please email me to be on the list to get an early bird access password to see the site.

Password is only for press affiliated sites.

email : midmarauder@gmail.com

Thanks so much ! 

MM

Martin Scorsese on Robert Altman on Vimeo

Scorsese on Altman

Midnight Marauder Presents  'It's Okay with Me.'

Robert Altman Online Poster Exhibition :

Featuring Behind the Scenes Photos, Facts and Written Words from some very cool Altman Buffs.

Coming Very Soon !!

  1. “Kansas City” Poster
  2. “The Long Goodbye” Poster
  3. “A Wedding” Posters
  4. “3 Women” Poster
  5. “McCabe and Mrs. Miller” Poster
  6. “Come Back to the 5 & Dime Jimmy Dean, Jimmy Dean” Poster

(Source: audreyrouget, via cinefamily)

Robert Altman’s “Kansas City”
Part of  'It's Okay with Me.'
An Online Poster Exhibition Based on Robert Altman’s Films
Coming Soon
Inquiries please contact : midmarauder@gmail.com
www.midnight-marauder.com
Also Don’t forget to get your tickets to The Robert Altman Retrospective over at the UCLA Film & TV Archives … I got mine !
Get yours today !!!

Robert Altman’s “Kansas City”

Part of  'It's Okay with Me.'

An Online Poster Exhibition Based on Robert Altman’s Films

Coming Soon

Inquiries please contact : midmarauder@gmail.com

www.midnight-marauder.com

Also Don’t forget to get your tickets to The Robert Altman Retrospective over at the UCLA Film & TV Archives … I got mine !

Get yours today !!!

cinephilearchive:

“Originally I didn’t want to do it. I’ve enjoyed reading Chandler, though I never did finish ‘The Long Goodbye,’ and I liked those 1940s movies, but I just didn’t want to play around with them. I was sent the script by the producers and at first I said, ‘I don’t want to do Raymond Chandler.’ If you say ‘Philip Marlowe,’ people just think of Humphrey Bogart. Robert Mitchum was being proposed for it. But I just didn’t want to do another Philip Marlowe film and have it wrap up the same way all the other films did. I think it was David Picker, the production chief at United Artists, who suggested Elliott Gould for Marlowe — and then I was interested.

 “She wrote that [The Big Sleep] like a man. She writes good.”Howard Hawks, quoted in Hawks on Hawks 

So I read Leigh Brackett's script — she wrote the script of ‘The Big Sleep’ for Hawks — and in her version, in the last scene, Marlowe pulled out his gun and killed his best friend, Terry Lennox. It was so out of character for Marlowe, I said, ‘I'll do the picture, but you cannot change that ending! It must be in the contract.’ They all agreed, which was very surprising. If she hadn't written that ending, I guarantee I wouldn't have done it. It said, ‘This is just a movie.’ After that, we had him do his funny little dance down the road and you hear ‘Hooray for Hollywood,’ and that's what it's really about — ‘Hooray for Hollywood.’ It even looked like a road made in a Hollywood studio. And with Eileen Wade driving past, it's like the final scene in ‘The Third Man’!

I decided that we were going to call him Rip Van Marlowe, as if he’d been asleep for twenty years, had woken up and was wandering through this landscape of the early 1970s, but trying to invoke the morals of a previous era. I put him in that dark suit, white shirt and tie, while everyone else was smelling incense and smoking pot and going topless; everything was health food and exercise and cool. So we just satirized that whole time. And that’s why that line of Elliott’s — ‘It’s OK with me’ — became his key line throughout the film.” —Robert Altman
Altman describes his particular way of shooting ‘The Long Goodbye’:
“I decided that the camera should never stop moving. It was arbitrary. We would just put the camera on a dolly and everything would move or pan, but it didn’t match the action; usually it was counter to it. It gave me that feeling that when the audience see the film, they’re kind of a voyeur. You’re looking at something you shouldn’t be looking at. Not that what you’re seeing is off limits; just that you’re not supposed to be there. You had to see over someone’s shoulder or peer round someone’s back. I just think that in so many films everything’s so beautiful, the lighting is gorgeous and with each shot everything is relit. My method also means you don’t have to light for close-ups; you only have to accommodate what may happen, so you just light the scene and it saves a lot of time. The rougher it looked, the better it served my purpose.
I was worried about the harsh light of southern California and I wanted to give the film the soft, pastel look you see on old postcards from the 1940s. So we post-flashed the film even further than we did on ‘McCabe & Mrs Miller,’ almost 100 percent.”

Leigh Brackett’s screenplay for ‘The Long Goodbye’ (NOTE: For educational purposes only). Thanks to bobdole1357 and the great folks at Write to Reel.

Film critic Tony Macklin visited Leigh Brackett “on a hot, humid, blazing July 1975 day” at her farmhouse in Kinsman, Ohio. “I vividly remember Leigh’s making us lemonade to help cool us — it was pure sugar.” See also: Leigh Brackett — Journeyman Plumber. As did some research for a post about ‘Rio Bravo,’ Daniel Martin Eckhart discovered more and more about what must have been a very special friendship between Brackett and Hawks.

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

//

cinephilearchive:

“Originally I didn’t want to do it. I’ve enjoyed reading Chandler, though I never did finish ‘The Long Goodbye,’ and I liked those 1940s movies, but I just didn’t want to play around with them. I was sent the script by the producers and at first I said, ‘I don’t want to do Raymond Chandler.’ If you say ‘Philip Marlowe,’ people just think of Humphrey Bogart. Robert Mitchum was being proposed for it. But I just didn’t want to do another Philip Marlowe film and have it wrap up the same way all the other films did. I think it was David Picker, the production chief at United Artists, who suggested Elliott Gould for Marlowe — and then I was interested.


“She wrote that [The Big Sleep] like a man. She writes good.”
Howard Hawks, quoted in Hawks on Hawks

So I read Leigh Brackett's script — she wrote the script of ‘The Big Sleep’ for Hawks — and in her version, in the last scene, Marlowe pulled out his gun and killed his best friend, Terry Lennox. It was so out of character for Marlowe, I said, ‘I'll do the picture, but you cannot change that ending! It must be in the contract.’ They all agreed, which was very surprising. If she hadn't written that ending, I guarantee I wouldn't have done it. It said, ‘This is just a movie.’ After that, we had him do his funny little dance down the road and you hear ‘Hooray for Hollywood,’ and that's what it's really about — ‘Hooray for Hollywood.’ It even looked like a road made in a Hollywood studio. And with Eileen Wade driving past, it's like the final scene in ‘The Third Man’!

I decided that we were going to call him Rip Van Marlowe, as if he’d been asleep for twenty years, had woken up and was wandering through this landscape of the early 1970s, but trying to invoke the morals of a previous era. I put him in that dark suit, white shirt and tie, while everyone else was smelling incense and smoking pot and going topless; everything was health food and exercise and cool. So we just satirized that whole time. And that’s why that line of Elliott’s — ‘It’s OK with me’ — became his key line throughout the film.” —Robert Altman

Altman describes his particular way of shooting ‘The Long Goodbye’:

“I decided that the camera should never stop moving. It was arbitrary. We would just put the camera on a dolly and everything would move or pan, but it didn’t match the action; usually it was counter to it. It gave me that feeling that when the audience see the film, they’re kind of a voyeur. You’re looking at something you shouldn’t be looking at. Not that what you’re seeing is off limits; just that you’re not supposed to be there. You had to see over someone’s shoulder or peer round someone’s back. I just think that in so many films everything’s so beautiful, the lighting is gorgeous and with each shot everything is relit. My method also means you don’t have to light for close-ups; you only have to accommodate what may happen, so you just light the scene and it saves a lot of time. The rougher it looked, the better it served my purpose.

I was worried about the harsh light of southern California and I wanted to give the film the soft, pastel look you see on old postcards from the 1940s. So we post-flashed the film even further than we did on ‘McCabe & Mrs Miller,’ almost 100 percent.”

Leigh Brackett’s screenplay for ‘The Long Goodbye’ (NOTE: For educational purposes only). Thanks to bobdole1357 and the great folks at Write to Reel.

Film critic Tony Macklin visited Leigh Brackett “on a hot, humid, blazing July 1975 day” at her farmhouse in Kinsman, Ohio. “I vividly remember Leigh’s making us lemonade to help cool us — it was pure sugar.” See also: Leigh Brackett — Journeyman Plumber. As did some research for a post about ‘Rio Bravo,’ Daniel Martin Eckhart discovered more and more about what must have been a very special friendship between Brackett and Hawks.

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

Midnight Marauder Presents  'It's Okay with Me.'

Robert Altman Poster Exhibition

  1. “Dr. T & the Women” Poster
  2. “A Wedding” Poster
  3. “The Long Goodbye” Posters
  4. “3 Women” Poster
  5. “McCabe and Mrs. Miller” Poster
  6. “Gosford Park” Poster

Coming Soon

For Press Kit Inquiries please contact : midmarauder@gmail.com

Coming Soon to UCLA

Robert Altman: A Retrospective

The UCLA Film & Television Archive proudly presents this tribute to legendary American filmmaker Robert Altman (1925- 2006), whose unique gifts as a storyteller and visionary are enshrined in such iconoclastic features as M*A*S*H (1970), Nashville (1975), The…

Robert Altman’s “A Wedding” Posters

Part of  'It's Okay with Me.'

An Online Poster Exhibition Based on Robert Altman’s Films

Coming Soon

Press Inquiries please contact : midmarauder@gmail.com

www.midnight-marauder.com

wandrlust:

It’s okay with me.

wandrlust:

It’s okay with me.