midnight marauder

Graphic Designer / Illustrator / Cinephile

thefilmstage:

Watch a documentary on the making of Once Upon a Time in the West.

One of the Greatest Endings in the History of Cinema

cinephilearchive:

Rarely seen photos from The Good, The Bad, and the Ugly: The final duel.

Sergio Leone’s 1966 cult masterpiece “The Good, the Bad and the Ugly” is well known for its final standoff in a circular cemetery (created especially for the film). The final shot of the film was intended to be a long helicopter shot of “Blondie” (probably Clint Eastwood’s double/stand-in) riding into the wide open countryside. However after the footage came back with too much bounce and shake, the shot was discarded (a static shot from the ground was used instead). The photos come from various sources, mostly my own collection of rare stills and a book called “Western Cult”. Photography by Angelo Novi. —Jordan Krug, the edit room floor

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Rare interview with Sergio Leone: The great director speaks about his trilogy; A Fistful of Dollars, For A few Dollars More and The Good, the Bad and the Ugly and his desire to make a new type of film in the USA.

Henry Fonda talks about his casting in Once Upon A Time in the West. The funny reason Sergio Leone cast him as the villain in Once Upon A Time In The West in this rare 1975 interview:

Leone’s West and Leone’s Style. It has lengthy interview material with both Clint Eastwood and Eli Wallach, along with English version supervisor Mickey Knox, producer Alberto Grimaldi, restorer John Kirk and critic Richard Shickel. Wallach tells his favorite stories and shows that he’s still as feisty as ever; Eastwood is in a reflective mood, as if he hadn’t thought about this period of his career in a long time. Both have fun remembering comical details of the shooting. They relate the story of the bridge scene as one of the funniest (but expensive) filming flubs of all time.

I made 58 films as an assistant—I was at the side of directors who applied all the rules: make it, for example, a close-up to show that the character is about to say something important. I reacted against all that and so close-ups in my films are always the expression of an emotion… so they call me a perfectionist and a formalist because I watch my framing. But I’m not doing it to make it pretty, I’m seeking, first and foremost, the relevant emotion. —Sergio Leone

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(Source: cinephilearchive)

Clint Eastwood’s “Unforgiven” Film Poster
MM = Midnight Marauder

Clint Eastwood’s “Unforgiven” Film Poster

MM = Midnight Marauder