midnight marauder

Graphic Designer / Illustrator / Cinephile
keyframedaily:

Trailer.

(Source: derzuzalla)

lottereinigerforever:

Orson Welles on the set of “Citizen Kane”

lottereinigerforever:

Orson Welles on the set of “Citizen Kane”

(via alexlaniosz)

lapitiedangereuse:

“You’d be foolish to fire that gun. With these mirrors, it’s difficult to tell – you are aiming at me, aren’t you? I’m aiming at you, lover. Of course, killing you is killing myself. It’s the same thing. But you know, I’m pretty tired of both of us.”

lapitiedangereuse:

“You’d be foolish to fire that gun. With these mirrors, it’s difficult to tell – you are aiming at me, aren’t you? I’m aiming at you, lover. Of course, killing you is killing myself. It’s the same thing. But you know, I’m pretty tired of both of us.”

Orson Welles’ The Magnificent Ambersons Poster by Midnight Marauder

Orson Welles’ The Magnificent Ambersons Poster by Midnight Marauder

Magnificent Obsession

One of the great tragedies in cinematic history was the fate of Orson Welles’s 1942 epic, The Magnificent Ambersons, which was cut, reshot, and mutilated by studio functionaries while its visionary director was working on another project in Brazil. Sixty years on, the 132 minutes of the original version—if indeed they exist—are still the holy grail of certain film buffs. The author follows the making, and unmaking, of a movie that Welles believed was the death of his Hollywood career.

There are two great “lost” movies in the annals of Hollywood filmmaking, Erich von Stroheim’s Greed and Orson Welles’s The Magnificent Ambersons. Neither film is lost in a literal, vanished-and-gone sense—both are available on video, are occasionally screened in theaters, and are highly regarded by film critics (four stars apiece in Leonard Maltin’s Movie & Video Guide, for example). Rather, their tragic “lost” status stems from the fact that they exist only in truncated, bowdlerized form, having been wrested from the hands of their visionary directors by studio functionaries who were too craven and bottom-line-obsessed to cut these directors some auteurist slack. Since both films well pre-date the preservationist era of film-as-art-and-heritage—Greed was released in 1925, The Magnificent Ambersons in 1942—they have suffered the further indignity of being unreconstructible; studios back in those days didn’t hang on to excised footage for the sake of future director’s cuts on DVD, so the reels upon reels of nitrate film trimmed from the original versions were—depending on which movie you’re talking about and which story you believe—burned, thrown in the garbage, dumped into the Pacific, or simply left to decompose in the vaults.

Wanna read more Click on the Link at the Top

Brad Pitt as Tyler Durden on the Cover of Film Comment Sept - Oct 99

Brad Pitt as Tyler Durden on the Cover of Film Comment Sept - Oct 99

keyframedaily:

Orson Welles's The Lady from Shanghai (1948).
Tribute to Hans Hillmann
Carol Reed’s "The Third Man" Poster
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Tribute to Hans Hillmann

Carol Reed’s "The Third Man" Poster

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Tribute to Hans Hillmann
Carol Reed’s "The Third Man" Poster
MM

Tribute to Hans Hillmann

Carol Reed’s "The Third Man" Poster

MM

cinephilearchive:

Orson Welles’ personal working copy of the script for the famed film, ‘Citizen Kane.’ The 156-page script, the last revised draft before the final shooting script, contains numerous annotations, revisions, and deletions, as well as the addition of a few new scenes.

Orson Welles and Herman J. Mankiewicz, the creative minds behind the acclaimed screenplay, produced seven total scripts for ‘Citizen Kane,’ each with critical modifications that culminated with the Oscar-winning script. The present script, clearly stamped “Second Revised Final Script” on the cover page, is Welles’ own copy of the sixth and final draft before the shooting script. All of the written changes in the script are in the hand of Welles’ assistant, Kathryn Trosper, as indicated by the blue pencil “Trosper” in the upper left hand corner of the cover. Additional text in pencil on the cover page includes, “Mr. Welles,” “new Breakfast scene,” as well as a listing of all pages on which changes had been made.

“The Citizen Kane script is the most important screenplay of all time,” said Leila Dunbar, Director of Sotheby’s Collectibles Department. “It was a collaboration where Herman Mankiewicz set the foundation and Orson Welles added the emotion, depth and power, raising the text to a much higher level. Mankiewicz gave the story life but Welles made it immortal.”

In 1941 the young Robert Wise met the equally young Orson Welles. And the rest, as they say, is film-history. Director Robert Wise talks about Orson Welles and working on ‘Citizen Kane’ (3:296:20) and his films in this 45 minute documentary.

“The director is simply the audience. So the terrible burden of the director is to take the place of that yawning vacuum, to be the audience and to select from what happens during the day which movement shall be a disaster and which a gala night. His job is to preside over accidents.” —Orson Welles

(via criterioncollection)

toninetica:

Citizen Kane 1941
Original French Poster

toninetica:

Citizen Kane 1941

Original French Poster

"Odd Man Out" Book Jacket
MM

"Odd Man Out" Book Jacket

MM

cinephilearchive:

Orson Welles’ personal working copy of the script for the famed film, ‘Citizen Kane.’ The 156-page script, the last revised draft before the final shooting script, contains numerous annotations, revisions, and deletions, as well as the addition of a few new scenes.

Orson Welles and Herman J. Mankiewicz, the creative minds behind the acclaimed screenplay, produced seven total scripts for ‘Citizen Kane,’ each with critical modifications that culminated with the Oscar-winning script. The present script, clearly stamped “Second Revised Final Script” on the cover page, is Welles’ own copy of the sixth and final draft before the shooting script. All of the written changes in the script are in the hand of Welles’ assistant, Kathryn Trosper, as indicated by the blue pencil “Trosper” in the upper left hand corner of the cover. Additional text in pencil on the cover page includes, “Mr. Welles,” “new Breakfast scene,” as well as a listing of all pages on which changes had been made.

“The Citizen Kane script is the most important screenplay of all time,” said Leila Dunbar, Director of Sotheby’s Collectibles Department. “It was a collaboration where Herman Mankiewicz set the foundation and Orson Welles added the emotion, depth and power, raising the text to a much higher level. Mankiewicz gave the story life but Welles made it immortal.”

In 1941 the young Robert Wise met the equally young Orson Welles. And the rest, as they say, is film-history. Director Robert Wise talks about Orson Welles and working on ‘Citizen Kane’ (3:296:20) and his films in this 45 minute documentary.

“The director is simply the audience. So the terrible burden of the director is to take the place of that yawning vacuum, to be the audience and to select from what happens during the day which movement shall be a disaster and which a gala night. His job is to preside over accidents.” —Orson Welles

(Source: cinephiliabeyond)